Author: Jon Williamson

January 6, 2020 Jon Williamson

In recent books, Jacob Stegenga and Alex Broadbent suggest that medicine is not very good at providing cures. Donald Gillies is unconvinced by their arguments – he replies to Broadbent here and Stegenga here. Meanwhile, Daniel Auker-Howlett and Michael Wilde review Gillies’ recent book on causality in medicine here.

December 4, 2019 Jon Williamson

At EBMlive this summer a working group got together to demand some fixes for the crisis that is facing present-day evidence-based medicine:

November 28, 2019 Jon Williamson

In two recent papers [(2017) Philosophers on drugs, Synthese, pp. 1-28, and (2018) In defense of meta-analysis, Synthese, pp. 1-23], Bennett Holman has criticized EBM+. I have replied to these criticisms, in a paper, which discusses issues of industrial funding and meta-analysis in relation to EBM+. For a downloadable pdf of this paper click here:…

June 13, 2019 Jon Williamson

This was the title of a workshop held on 11 June 2019 at the University of Kent. This workshop explored practical consequences of recent philosophical work on health. Videos are available of the talks: Alexandra Trofimov: Clarifying the duty to inform. Video Michael Wilde: Expanding the notion of evidence in evidence-based medicine. Video Jon Williamson:…

May 16, 2019 Jon Williamson

This is one of the questions that will be tackled by a new research project, Evidential pluralism in the social sciences, supported by the Leverhulme Trust and running 2019-2022. If evidence of mechanisms should be evaluated alongside clinical studies when assessing effectiveness claims in medicine, shouldn’t evidence of mechanisms also be evaluated alongside association studies…

November 20, 2018 Jon Williamson

BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine has published an appeal from the research groups CauseHealth, EBM+ and PhilPharm, as well as other researchers, to broaden the evidence base considered by evidence-based medicine.   In particular, the signatories maintain that: “Establishing causation often requires the use of multiple methods since no single method will be universally applicable or perfect…